Can I Afford A Personal Trainer?

Most people think a personal trainer is a luxury only for the rich and famous.  You see celebrities on TV talking about their personal trainers, personal chefs, and nutritionists and think, “Well, it’s easy to be in fantastic shape when you have all that!”  The truth is, you can have all of that if you look carefully at your priorities and your budget.  But how much is the right amount to spend for you personally?  Just because you have $500 set aside, does that mean you have to spend all $500?  In this article, I’m going to discuss how you can afford a personal trainer, and what kinds of packages might be right for your budget and your fitness routine.

Most people laugh when someone suggests they get a personal trainer.  How could they possibly afford it?  I’m willing to bet you have more money to put towards your own health than you think, but it has to become a priority for you.

Going Out for Dinner and Drinks

If going out to dinner 2-3 times per week is more important to you, then there’s not much I can do to change your mind.  But the fact is, if you cut back on going out to dinner or getting drinks, the money you’d save could easily pay for 1-2 sessions per week with a trainer.  Look at your budget and see exactly how much you spend on going out for food and drinks each month.  Not only will this save your wallet, but it will also help you with your weight loss goals by cutting out excess calories.

Vacations

I’m certainly not telling you to never go on a vacation ever again.  We all need to get away for a little while.  However, could your weekend trips be adding up?  Take a look at how many mini-vacations and getaways you’ve had in the past year and add up how much money it cost you.  Again, you don’t have to cut all of them out, but if you cut down on them a bit, there’s money left over to put towards something you may want to prioritize, like your health.

Morning Rituals

Most Americans grab a cup of coffee from the local Starbucks on their way to work.  Sure, it’s only a few bucks, but it’s money that could be easily saved by making your own coffee at home.  If Starbucks is your favorite coffee, you can even buy the blend of the exact coffee you buy for your coffee maker at home.  By switching, you could easily save yourself over $800 per year ($3.50 per cup x 250 work days per year)!

These are all small changes that almost everyone can make to save a little money on something they prioritize. The main point I’m trying to make is before you claim you can’t afford to make a change, look at your budget and see what you’re really spending your money on.  Do you value these things more than you value your health?

Price Ranges For Personal Training

Now, let’s look at the varying prices you can expect to pay for different types of training.  Depending on your exercise needs and your budget, one of these types of training might appeal to you more than others.  Let’s take a look at each one and examine the pros and cons.

1 on 1 Personal Training

1 on 1 training is always going to be the most beneficial way to get in shape.  The trainer is 100% dedicated to you and only you and they can adjust your workout for your specific needs.  Do you have a back problem?  Do you have high blood pressure?  These are all things that a trainer who’s training you 1 on 1 will be able to look out for by adjusting your workout routine.  Because this is the most personalized and thorough approach, it’s of course going to be the most expensive option.  Most personal trainers in Philadelphia can range from $60-$85 per hour long session, depending on their education, experience, and success rates with past clients.  While many people looking for personal trainers might try to look for the cheapest option, I’d like to give a warning: just like anything else, you get what you pay for.  Would you hire a lawyer who charged $20 per hour?  Would you hire a mechanic who charges $30 to fix your car that doesn’t run?  Probably not.

Small Group Training

Small group training can be an excellent option for those who still want some close attention during their workouts but they don’t have any serious issues that need to be addressed.  This is more of an option for fairly healthy individuals looking to lose a few pounds.  The group dynamic can make the workout fun and it can help motivate you to show up.  If having a personal trainer who expects you to come isn’t motivation enough, how would you feel if 3 of your friends called you every time you failed to show up for a session?  The accountability factor is what keeps you coming back consistently.  These small group sessions are significantly less than 1 on 1 training because you’re not getting that ultra personalized workout.  These can range from $25-$50 per hour long session depending on the exact size of the group.

30 Minute Sessions

If the idea of not having a personalized approach scares you but you can’t afford 60 minute sessions with a trainer, 30 minute sessions might be just for you.  By doing your warm-up before your trainer shows up, you cut out some of the time the two of you need to spend together.  I should warn you, if you’re expecting to chit chat during this 30 minute session, you’ll be in for a rude awakening.  30 minute sessions are usually more fast-paced due to the time constraints.  These can be a great way to make sure you get in some sort of effective workout more often.  Expect the cost of these sessions to be a little more than half the cost of that trainer’s 60 minute sessions.  So if the trainer charges $70 per hour, expect to pay around $45-$50 for a 30 minute session.

Boot Camps/Large Group Sessions

The last option I’m going to give you today is the least expensive option.  Boot camps or large group sessions (typically 5-15 people) can give you an effective workout in a fun and dynamic group setting.  The workouts are usually designed so you’re working out side by side with your fellow participants and this really gives you a chance to feel more like a bonded group.  This group dynamic can also create more of a feeling of accountability.  However, the problem with these large groups is that you will not receive the same personalized attention you would with 1 on 1 training.  If you’re healthy with no health issues, that might be fine for you.  However, the client with high blood pressure, back problems, and a bad knee might not benefit from large group instruction.  This type of training is the least expensive and can range from $10-$30 per class.

I hope I’ve given you some insight on what types of training you can afford so you can get professional help as you work towards your fitness goals.  Remember, not all options are for everyone.  Whether you need to be more budget conscious or you need more personalized attention, there is an option made for you.  So sit down and take a careful look at your budget and a careful look at what type of instruction you need and then decide if you can afford a personal trainer.

If you have more questions on these types of training packages and you’re in the Philadelphia area, please feel free to contact me using my contact page or by calling 267-838-2301.